We’re always up to something here at Hireology Headquarters; whether it’s working on the new design of our platform (we promise…you don’t have to wait much longer) or playing with the new glass beaker. As clichŽ as it may sound, it’s true, we work hard so we get a chance to play. That being said, all Hireologists agree that one of the best parts about working here is the fantastic company culture. If you promise not to tell anyone I’ll let you in on a little secret: I would rather spend the day with my coworkers than my roommates…they’re obviously much cooler.  

The thing is, building a great company culture is easy, as long as you have the right team – which you must since you’re using Hireology interview guides and skills tests (and if you’re not you should be!) Even TLNT says company culture just can’t be ignored. This is the perfect time of year to revamp your company culture or even start from scratch! How? It’s a piece of cake, or pie if we’re sticking with the whole Fall/Winter theme. 

Here are Hireology’s 3 tips to improve company culture by the end of the year:

1. Have a costume party (seriously!)

Halloween falls on a Wednesday this year, so why not encourage your employees to dress up? At Hireology HQ we’ll be holding a “come as your coworker” party, complete with an impressions contest at lunch. We are still a startup, so of course we’ll still be working, but being able to dress up and have some fun during lunch is a great way to get the creative juices flowing. Plus, it’s not everyday that you get the chance to dress up as your CEO!

2. Plan a holiday bash

Black Friday ads will soon be taking over once again, and you know what that means – the weeks start flying by and suddenly you find yourself at the end of February wondering where time went. Whew…I’m exhausted just thinking about it! Putting together a holiday bash for your employees not only gives them something to look forward to, but it also allows them to slow down for just a moment and enjoy watching the streetlights illuminate the glittering snowfall.

These parties don’t need to suck the last of the pennies out of your budget – it’s all about the creativity. Whether the party is held during lunch for the employees or after hours for families as well, it’s a great way to spread positivity and build your company culture. And if it’s really good, your employees will be talking about it for months to come!

3. Volunteer

The holiday season is all about giving back, right? No matter how large or small your company is, taking a few hours out of the day to give back to the community can make a world of difference. Whether you get the team together for a few hours in the afternoon or on a Saturday morning, getting everyone together outside of the office can do wonders to improve company culture. I guarantee that after you spend some time volunteering, you’ll leave feeling refreshed and, more importantly, like you actually made a difference. We’re not saying you have to plan a huge charity event, but getting the team together to help out at an animal shelter, food pantry or hospital will not only improve the lives of those you are helping, but the lives of your employees as well.

Really, what’s better than seeing a smile creep across the face of someone you helped?

Whether you have a costume contest for Halloween or a small luncheon around the holidays, building a strong company culture is the foundation to building a passionate team. That passion will go a long way, not just in terms of productivity, but in spreading the word about your company as well. 

Remember though, it’s important to nurture the culture you’ve worked so hard to build, so make sure you’re working year-round to keep the culture strong. To get some ideas about how to keep employees passionate and motivated throughout the year, read Inc.’s article on inexpensive ways to build culture

Don’t let a lacking company culture drive away your employees. Learn how to turn turnover into retention! 

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